AUGUST 2018 | BRINGING INNOVATIONS TO MARKET | A publication of Purdue Research Foundation
Purdue TechTransfer Express
New robotic technology may provide more insight into neurological diseases, which affect about one-third of Americans

Researchers are a step closer to answering one of the critical questions about the brain – how neural networks in the organ perform the computations necessary for higher-level brain functions.
INSIGHT INTO NEUROLOGICAL DISEASES >>


Transistor technology may improve speed, battery life for computers, mobile phones and other electronics
 
Purdue innovators have developed transistor technology that shows potential for improving computers and mobile phones. The new design for field effect transistors, which are basic switching devices in computers and other electronic devices, makes the transistors promising candidates for next generation nanodevices.  
IMPROVE COMPUTER SPEED >> 


New instruments push boundaries for precise measurements in jet engines, gas turbines

A Purdue University-affiliated startup is developing instruments to precisely measure pressure, temperature and other analytics inside the harsh environments of rocket engines and gas turbines.  
PRECISE MEASUREMENTS IN JET ENGINES, GAS TURBINES>>


Large scale nanomanufacturing of two-dimensional tellurium (tellurene) 

Innovators have developed a substrate-free solution phase process to synthesize a new type of large-area, high-quality 2D semiconducting crystals of tellurium (tellurene). This new type of high quality, substrate-free 2D semiconducting crystal exhibits superior performance in room-temperature transistors.
SUPERIOR TRANSISTOR PERFORMANCE>>


Biological sensing and actuation using CMOS microelectrode arrays
 
Researchers have developed a highly-flexible microelectrode array built on a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip that senses live cells, neurons, and live tissues.This technology improves yield and sensitivity and offers the advantages of wireless link and wireless powering.
BIOLOGICAL SENSING AND ACTUATION>> 


Photon counting method extends linear dynamic range

Purdue innovators have developed a simple photon counting method that provides seven orders of magnitude in linear dynamic range for a single photomultiplier tube detector. This method bridges an existing gap in maintaining quantitation over measurements with high contrast and has potential application in microscopy and spectroscopy.
EXTENDED LINEAR DYNAMIC RANGE>>


High quality resolution in photon counting

Researchers at Purdue University have increased accuracy of photon and ion counting by developing a novel technology that maximizes the resolution between events in particle counting. The technology could increase the speed of data transmission.
HIGH QUALITY RESOLUTION>>


Algorithm eliminates pixel-dependent noise from microscopy images 

An algorithm that eliminates pixel-dependent noise/readout noise from microscopy images has been developed at Purdue University. The algorithm restores images to results seen with an ideal camera, making it possible to perform quantitative studies.
ALGORITHM ELIMINATES NOISE FROM MICROSCOPY IMAGES >>


Novel copper-manganese casting alloys

Innovators have found new copper-manganese (Cu-Mn) alloys that contain additional elements, such as nickel (Ni), which have been shown to greatly enhance the overall mechanical properties. The alloys have higher strength and do not require lead, which is greatly restricted due to health concerns.
Novel casting alloys >>


Skin-like electronic bandage for monitoring vital signs and delivering therapeutics

Skin-electronics is an ultrathin platform that adheres to the skin for the continuous, noninvasive monitoring of health status while providing therapeutic benefits for wearers.  Researchers have developed skin-electronics with superior crack resistance, stretchability, contact adhesion and strength when compared to conventional skin-electronics.
SKIN-LIKE ELECTRONIC BANDAGE>>

Click here for more information on these and other Purdue technologies >>
 

Spotlight on Darcy Bullock..

Darcy Bullock is the Lyles Family Professor of Civil Engineering and director of the Joint Transportation Research Program. He has been the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the Walter L. Huber Engineering Prize from the American Society of Civil Engineers, Purdue University Faculty Scholar and Best Paper Awards from the Journal of Transportation Engineering, the Transportation Research Board and the Institute of Transportation Engineers.
  
His research focuses on intelligent transportation systems, real time traffic control, image-based vehicle detection, traffic operations and traffic safety. Through Discovery Park, Bullock leads up the Innovation Hub for Connected and Autonomous Transportation Technologies, a joint research effort between Purdue University, public agencies and private partners.

Learn more>>
 


 
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