SEPTEMBER 2018 | BRINGING INNOVATIONS TO MARKET | A publication of Purdue Research Foundation
Purdue TechTransfer Express
Medicine for goose might not be best for gander; Purdue-affiliated startup creates printer that makes customized medicines for pets

A startup is using Purdue University-patented technology to produce precise, customized medicine for pets.
CUSTOMIZED MEDICINE FOR PETS >>


Good vibrations: Purdue researchers develop technology that uses pulses to send messages through the skin
 
Researchers have developed a method of sending messages in English by using vibrations on a person’s skin.
TECHNOLOGY SENDS MESSAGES THROUGH VIBRATIONS ON SKIN  >> 


Invisible friends: Startup developing software to help understand vast data of microbiomes to solve world problems

A Purdue University-affiliated startup is developing an intelligent software platform aimed at helping biologists to use microbes, the microscopic organisms that live in, on and around humans, plants, animals and more to cure diseases, improve crops and make livestock healthier.
INVISIBLE FRIENDS>>


SEL Purdue breaks ground at Purdue Discovery Park District, to create 300-plus jobs 

A groundbreaking alumnus of Purdue University helped break ground Friday (Sept. 21) on SEL Purdue, a 100,000-square-foot facility for electric power research that will support 300-plus new high-tech jobs and serve as an anchor in the university’s Discovery Park District.
SEL PURDUE BREAKS GROUND DISTRICT>>


Veteran entrepreneurial leader named Purdue Research Foundation’s chief innovation and collaboration officer
 
Purdue University President Mitch Daniels and Purdue Research Foundation President Brian Edelman have jointly announced the appointment of David Broecker as the foundation’s chief innovation and collaboration officer. 
VETERAN ENTREPRENEURIAL LEADER>>

Purdue develops ‘augmented reality’ tools to help health care workers save lives in war zones, natural disasters, rural areas

Purdue University researchers have developed a unique approach that allows experienced surgeons and physicians around the world to help less-experienced doctors in war zones, natural disasters and in rural areas perform complicated procedures.
AUGMENTED REALITY TOOLS HELP HEALTH CARE WORKERS>>

Electrical Resistance Measurements Quantify Asphalt Emulsion Curing Times

Researchers at Purdue University have developed a method and equipment to measure the curing of emulsified asphalts quantitatively. This technology uses electrical resistance measurements to measure the optimum curing time for asphalt emulsions. The timing and frequency of measurements are without limit. Field tests indicate that chip seal systems gain significant mechanical strength when the initial electrical resistance measurement increases by a factor of 10. The test equipment features portability and low cost.
ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE MEASUREMENTS>>

Inhibitors could open the door for how Ebola and Marburg are treated 

A potential drug treatment for virus infections including Ebola and Marburg has been developed at Purdue. This technology relies on selective inhibition of virus entry by a chemotype that inhibits the host vacuolar-ATPase. This will allow for the inhibition of the viral cell. This technology also allows for the inhibition of a host protein which will be key in treating these two viruses, because protein is needed for the viruses to achieve infection and replication. This new technology could open the door for how Ebola and Marburg are treated.
TECHNOLOGY COULD TREAT EBOLA AND MARBURG>>

Surgical sealant with higher binding strength


At Purdue, researchers have improved the adhesive strength of a first generation surgical sealant. Measured on pig skin at physiological conditions, the adhesive strength of the second generation was higher than the first generation. Measured on aluminum, the second generation adhesive was 130% stronger than first generation and 14,000% stronger than Tisseel (commercially available surgical sealant from Baxter).
Higher binding strength>>


Overexpression of ONA1 to Increase Plant Biomass and Seed Yield

Researchers at Purdue University have developed an overexpression of the ONA1 gene. The ONA1 gene regulates plant fertility by controlling the number of ovules produced as well as regulating pollen development. Overexpression of ONA1 could be used to increase both the number of flowers and the number of ovules per flower. Since ONA1 also increases branching, its overexpression could also be used to increase overall biomass in bioenergy and forage crops.
INCREASE PLANT BIOMASS AND SEED YIELD>>

Click here for more information on these and other Purdue technologies >>
 

Spotlight on Sophie Lelièvre...

Lelièvre obtained her undergraduate degree as engineer in veterinary sciences from the University of Louvain (Belgium) and her D.V.M. degree from the University of Liège (Belgium) in 1990. She worked as a veterinarian in the emergency room in the Paris area (France) from 1990 to 1995, while pursuing M.S. and Ph.D. graduate studies in cancer pharmacology at the Gustave Roussy Cancer Institute and University of Paris VI (Pierre & Marie Curie).
 
Lelièvre joined the Department of Basic Medical Sciences at Purdue, as a faculty member and Walther Cancer Institute Scholar, in October 2000. Her research program has been externally funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Department of Defense Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) among other agencies. It focuses on the role of the organization of the cell nucleus in gene expression and genome stability and the relationship between tissue polarity and nuclear functions, notably epigenetics.

Learn more>>
 


 
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