The Staff at CASY wish you and your family a Merry Christmas
and Happy New Year!

The CASY office will be closed the following days:
Friday, December 22nd
Monday, December 25th
Tuesday, December 26th
Friday, December 29th
Monday, January 1st





Safe Sleep Corner

Blankets in cribs

Children under one year old may NOT have a blanket in the crib, even if they are able to roll over.  Blankets are considered soft bedding and can be a suffocation hazard.  Even children that roll around on their own and move well outside the crib can still suffocate if the blanket is pulled up close to their face.  Blankets can not be stored in the crib when the child is awake either.  Make sure your crib is free of all soft bedding, including blankets, at all times!  If you feel children will be cold, dress them in a sleep sack. Sleep sacks are wearable blankets and come in different weights and sizes. 
If you have any questions about blankets, sleep sacks or soft bedding, please contact Jill at ext 34.      

Parents Speak Out After Losing Child to Positional Asphyxia

Parents in Indianapolis are speaking out to educate other parents after losing their 4 month old to positional asphyxia.  The link is below to the full story.  Indiana currently ranks 7th in the nation in the highest number of infants dying and one of the main reasons is unsafe sleep practices.  Please be sure to let your parents know there is a program available to assist if they don’t have a crib.  The Safe Crib program is available in every county.  Multiple agencies, including CASY, provide the training that they can attend and receive a crib.  Please share this story with as many parents as you can and help them to understand the importance of safe sleep.  Have potential or new parents contact Jill at ext. 34 to find out more about the Safe Crib program. 




Infant Cereal and Bottles

While the habit of adding cereal to an infant’s bottle is one that has been around for a long time, there are several compelling reasons why you really shouldn’t do it!  It is in violation of licensing, Registered Ministry regulations and CACFP food program.  Infant cereal is considered table food and should be treated as such.  It should be fed to infants with a spoon when they are developmentally ready.  Infant cereal in a bottle can be considered a choking hazard as many babies are not capable of swallowing solids while taking a bottle.  If you have any questions or need some guidance on feeding tips please call Jill at ext. 34 or contact your CACFP provider.

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/feeding-nutrition/Pages/Cereal-in-a-Bottle-Solid-Food-Shortcuts-to-Avoid.aspx




Infant Physical Activity

It’s important that infants get the chance to move around and stretch their tiny bodies.  Many times we forget how little they actually move.  To give them ample supervised opportunities to move, place infants on the floor and out of restraining devices.  Restraining devices are things such as exosaucers, walkers, bouncy seats, johnny jumpers, swings, etc.  Many of these devices actually delay physical development and are not recommended.  Make your facility a place for infants to thrive and move on their own and make it restraining-device free! 
For more information on the importance of physical development in infants or how to set up a great infant environment, please contact the
Infant-Toddler Specialist – Jill at ext 34. 
Other helpful resources.

https://www.gracepointwellness.org/461-child-development-parenting-infants-0-2/article/10109-infancy-physical-development-gross-motor-skills

http://activeforlife.com/help-infant-develop-movement-skills/




Ages & Stages: Becoming Generous


In this wonderful article, Susan A. Miller and Ellen Church discuss the importance of children learning generosity and what you can do to help.  Read the full article here to explore how 3-6 year olds can learn how to give (& take), find joy in giving and helping others, as well as the benefits of generosity, like making new friends.




Feeling stressed from the holidays?  Here are 5 tips to help you de-stress:

- Take time for yourself, even if it's just 10 minutes
- Set limits and boundaries 
- Sleep at least 7-8 hours each night
- Create a holiday playlist
- Disconnect by turning off your phone, etc.


"Never worry about the size of your Christmas tree. 
In the eyes of children, they are all 30 feet tall."

-Larry Wilde